Articles of Confederation v. the Constitution

Length: 2 Pages 515 Words

Articles of Confederation vs. the U.S. Constitution The Articles of Confederation and the U.S. Constitution are two systems of government that were adopted by the United States as the backbone to their society. The Articles of Confederation was the first form of government established by the United States. It was a union between the newly declared thirteen states. Many delegates realized that the Articles of Confederation was a weak form of government and called a convention after what became known as Shays’s Rebellion. At this convention, delegates debated and finally decided that the United States needed a new form of government. Once all debate and compromise was over the Constitution was established. The Articles of Confederation was the first constitutio Continue...


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There were no federal court systems and all laws and court cases were handled by the state governments. Passing laws required approval by nine of the thirteen states. It is a bicameral form of government. They both represent a nation that believes in natural rights for its citizens. Constitution, in which we still abide by today. The Constitution established a federal court system known as the Supreme Court and appointed justices to head it. The upper house is the Senate and it consists of two representatives from each state; and the lower house it the House of Representatives, which is based on population. Passing a law requires 50 approval and the signature of the President. It is the supreme law of the United States. Congress was unicameral, or a single-chamber legislature and each state had the same amount of power no matter their size or population. When documents needed to be amended, it tool approval by all thirteen states for ratification.

PROFESSIONAL ESSAYS:

The Supreme Court in American History
The earlier Articles of Confederation had created an anarchic situation in which the In Gibbons v. Ogden, the Court interpreted these powers expansively. (1449 6 )

The Federalist Papers
or in the terms of often used, between liberalism v. republicanism. a far stronger central government than that embodied in the Articles of Confederation. (2174 9 )

The Federalist Papers
or in the terms of often used, between liberalism v. republicanism. a far stronger central government than that embodied in the Articles of Confederation. (2149 9 )

Objective of The Federalist
or in the terms of often used, between liberalism v. republicanism. a far stronger central government than that embodied in the Articles of Confederation. (2174 9 )

INS and Chadha Deportation Case
a more stringent procedure would be that of the Articles of Confederation: Article IX 1099, 1121 (1793) to Horning v. District of Columbia, 254 US 135, 138 (2557 10 )

Gubernatorial Leadership
Having just emerged from the unworkable Articles of Confederation, Messrs For the first seventy years of existence, the advocates of Federal v. States Rights (2687 11 )