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King Tut

Over 3,300 years ago, a young King, known as Tutankhamen, inherited the rule of the Egyptian kingdom. Given that Tut was only nine years old at the time, guardian officials tended to political duties while the boy publicly matured into manhood. Tutankhamen’s popularity, among his people, grew rapidly over the next ten years. However, many coveted this position as King and considered themselves fortunate for not having to be concerned about competing with an heir. King Tutankhamen never conceived a son. Then, somewhere between the ages of the eighteen and twenty, Tutankhamen died, leaving his empire in a state of shock and depression. Whether the King was murdered or died of an accident is still a mystery; and although plunderers attempted to break into the tomb, the details of Tut’s burial chamber were not uncovered until 1922 (Rigby). The following paragraphs will discuss the visual appearance, construction details, past and present locations of King Tutankhamen’s coffins. The three coffins are quite different in their physical composition and length. However, their appearances and meanings are very similar. Each coffin is the depiction of the Egyptian god Osiris, who appears as a human-faced bird. Osiris is associated with fertility and was the first god incarnated on Earth. The head of each is also crowned with the presence of the vulture goddess, Nekhbet, and the image of the divine cobra, Buto. However, one of the most captivating details of the coffins is the black eyes and eyebrows that stand out of each face. Such bold and piercing eyes immediately capture the viewer and portray Tut with both beauty and authority. Then, beneath the head of each casket is the similar layout of the body. The arms of this representation of King Tut lie parallel to his body and are bent at the elbows. The forearms are folded across the upper abdomen and lie left over the right. In one hand, the young King holds a flail and in the other gr...

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King Tut. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 13:03, November 28, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/14995.html