Wordsworth and Malouf

Length: 11 Pages 2759 Words

William Wordsworth and David Malouf offer views on humanity's relationship with the natural world that have many similarities in some areas, and contrast in other areas. David Malouf, in his novel "An Imaginary Life" emphasises the importance of being at one and in harmony with the natural world, the wild. He believes that by finding our identity in nature, we devolve back to a state of childhood innocence and in this state only can we find true happiness. Wordsworth goes to the next level. He agrees with Malouf that nature is a universal teacher, but believes also that nature is deified. The natural world that he speaks of is the tamed wild of the English countryside whereas Malouf writes about Ovid's journey to Tomis which is a much wilder, harsher and untamed natural world. It is therefore through a deep understanding of the composer's perspectives, we gain an insight into the values and attitudes the composers see as important in life. The are four main areas that have to be dealt with in order to understand the similarities and differences in the composer's mentalities. The context in which they deal is important, but also leads on to the comparison between their views on nature and the wild. The catalysts that Mal Continue...


The Child is perhaps not given a name as he is desired to stay anonymous by Malouf to show he is not representative of something human, but rather is nature itself. He is suggesting to us that Europeans will find their identity in nature as the Aborigines have done since the Dreamtime. In "An Imaginary Life", there are three important catalysts that change Ovid as a person. Both think that even time needs to be measured in a natural way. ouf and Wordsworth employ are somewhat varied but their values a reinforced in their ideas of fate and destiny in our lives. ) In an article "Wordsworth and Coleridge on Nature" Keylan Qazzaz points out that nature indeed exposes the pain in human life which is completely in line with my perception. By writing in first person, the respective composers implore us to consider the thoughts and values raised in the book regarding nature and apply them to our own lives. William Wordsworth and David Malouf offer views on humanity's relationship with the natural world that have many similarities in some areas, and contrast in other areas. It involves a 'solitary highland lass' harvesting grain on a rural farm. The harmonious relationships with nature in both texts are juxtaposed with the majority of human interactions with nature which are negative. He is telling us that the natural world we need to immerse ourselves in need not be void of any trace of civilisation, but should be far away from the hustle and bustle of city life after the industrial revolution. Rhetoric question also plays an important part in both texts. It is only after they leave Tomis and completely enter the wild that Ovid is able to find himself. After this, he is forced into the wild so like it or not, he must deal with nature. Malouf's is the real, barbaric wild, Wordsworth's wild is much tamer.