Create a new account

It's simple, and free.

Social Class of Victorian England

Research Task: Attitudes and values relating to the Social Class The social classes in the book, Pygmalion, are presented as a very rigid and distinctive system. Bernard Shaw’s renowned play presents a wide variety of conformist values based upon the Victorianism of that era. Though classes in the past were much more widespread and valued than at present, this was because society had not reached a sufficient state of its own knowledge, understanding and advancement in comparison to the now modern pop cultural era, in other words, more socialist-based in regard to broader perspectives and deeper awareness on society inducing such actions like Human Rights Acts. The sources provided here encompassed a wide range of rich literal interpretations of society in different time allocations, many of which were also produced in varying lifestyles and locations as well. The sources presented here generally showed the gradual deterioration of the rigid social class system. Shaw’s ‘Pygmalion’ is based on a classical myth in Ovid’s ‘Metamorphosis’. A man named Pygmalion is drawn away from the women in his society as they afflicted his sense of femineity. As a result, he choses to live alone where he creates in his view the most perfect woman in the form of a statue, Galatea. When he goes to the temple of Venus, the Goddess is touched by his tale of love and grants him his ultimate desire, to bring the statue to life. In Shaw’s Victorian rendition of this allegory, he exposes the inadequacy of myth and romance. It is evident in ‘Pygmalion’ and ‘Metamorphosis’ that feminism is the most prominent form portraying the classes in society as well as the values and attitudes towards it and further ideas generated from it. Shaw has subsided the allegory to a more humane level thus effectively conveying his own ideas bringing the difficultly conceived Galatea and compacting into the deplorable Eliza Doolittle. Being a Socialist...

Page 1 of 5 Next >

Related Essays:

Loading...
APA     MLA     Chicago
Social Class of Victorian England. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 05:30, December 18, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/1794.html