Biblical Allusion in Song of S

Length: 8 Pages 1994 Words

Biblical Allusions in Song of Solomon Upon first glance at the title of Toni Morrison’s novel, Song of Solomon, one might typically be reminded of its readily apparent biblical connection. The Song of Songs, one of the seven Wisdom Books of the Bible, is commonly referred to as the ‘Song of Solomon,’ since its authorship is often attributed to the biblical King Solomon. Predominantly and at its surface, the Song of Songs is an extended love poem (Imbrie 474). Biblical scholars argue that the book attempts to metaphorically convey Jesus’ love for the Church and his people in terms of human love (New American Bible, ed. preface, Song of Songs 1). Because of this connection, many scholars assert that the title attempts to further the motif of sexuality apparent throughout the book (Imbrie 475). When placed in more subtle contexts within the novel, however, certain other meanings may be derived. The character of Solomon within the novel relates closely to King Solomon of the Old Testament and, additionally, brings forth more profound metaphorical connections to the New Testament. Though this focuses more strictly upon the parallels between the Solomons as characters, the love parallels between Song of Songs and Song Continue...


But who was the "black lady who fell down on the ground Why did she throw her body all around It sounded like she was having a fit. Peggy Ochoa succinctly demonstrates a potential striking connection between the Old Testament's Solomon and the New Testament's Christ: The usual Christian interpretation of the lovers' relationship in Song of Solomon considers them to be the prophetic manifestation of the relationship between Christ and his bride, the church. Morrison also draws a potential parallel to the Bible through Jake, "the only son of Solomon (Morrison 302); Solomon abandoned his son and twenty daughters in his flight, alienating them from himself like northern Jews from the rest of Israel, "othering himself. (Ochoa) If Morrison holds her parallel between Solomon and King Solomon true throughout her novel, and King Solomon is in fact prophet to Jesus, then the Solomon of the novel might, in turn, be indirect prophet to Jesus. One of Solomon's most documented and intriguing marriages is that of his union with Sheba, an Ethiopian queen (Ochoa). However, many scholars attribute the poem to be an allegory demonstrating the Lord's compassion for his people, and vice versa. The alienation aspect is most significant in that it relates directly to Milkman's grandfather. From the perspective of the Hebrew historian, he was "unsurpassed for sagacity and knowledge, and with this wisdom this helped to bring peace to ailing Israel ("Solomon). "The wisdom of Solomon as political theology. The most likely connection between the three figures, then, seems to be in their connection to their fundamental identities: Jesus as a savior, the King as a peaceful ruler, Solomon as an African. Solomon of the novel fled his entire family and all that he knew for his own purposes. Solomon indeed attempts to symbolize, on a literal level in the first person, the consummation of love between a man and a woman.