Create a new account

It's simple, and free.

Women In War

For women, wartime was considered “the best years of their lives” by some people and historians. Not only did women come to the country’s aid in time of need, they also started the concept of women having a job. The idea of women at work during World War II was not utterly new. In the previous years of World War I, women were nursing sisters, volunteers, and there were even some women in the Navy. Before “the war to end all wars”, work was considered a man’s job. Normally, a woman’s place was in the house tending to her children, and doing housework such as cleaning and cooking. If a lady had a job, the job would usually be as a teacher, librarian, sales clerk, or secretary but it would never require hard labor. (Encarta 98; World Book Encyclopedia; World at War, p.31) As World War II came around however, the situation changed. Men were starting to be drafted as part of the air force, military, and other war related jobs. Men left their working positions to answer their call of duty, therefore leaving many empty jobs. Since there was such a shortage of workers, some immigrants took vacant jobs, but many more workers were still needed. The lack of employees led to advertisements encouraging women get a job. One of the most famous ads showed an imaginary character named Rosie the Riveter. Rosie the Riveter was well kept and had rosy cheeks; a true lady. This advertisement not only made working look attractive, but patriotic as well. When women realized that they could work and still be feminine, they started looking for jobs. Some people had a problem with women working. Industry was hesitant to hire women because they thought the only reason women wanted a job was to earn a little spending money. Industry was also afraid that female employees would marry and leave their job. (Encarta 98 Article: Rosie the Riveter ) Women helped out during the war by holding an assortment of jobs. Some helped the war directly by...

Page 1 of 6 Next >

Related Essays:

Loading...
APA     MLA     Chicago
Women In War. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 11:18, August 23, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/55778.html