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Roman ART

The following works bear a following to Roman art for reasons, which will be explored. As well as just how they are representative of a conscious or unconscious revival of antiquity. The Aachen chapel illustrates a vast following from ancient Roman civilization for several reasons. Firstly due to Charlamagne’s visits to Italy, he aspired to create a building with the same architectural impact as those in the Roman era. The octagonal plan is a descendant of the mausoleum of Sta. Costanza erected in Rome. As well the chapel contains piers and vaults that seem to echo the Roman ideal of massive geometric structures. This was in respect a strongly conscious move to the revival of Roman traditions due to the research done by Charlamagne himself throughout Italy prior to the construction of this building. The Gero Crucifix bares a following to earlier Roman trends in a number of different ways. Although seems to rely more so on a revival of Byzantine influences as well as Early Christian. This can be understood by looking at The Crucifixion from Monastary Church in Daphne Greece. There is a much stronger resemblance between these two works then there is with Roman pieces. This seems to be an unconscious move for the reason that there is a lack of proof that the artist (who commissioned this work for the Archbishop Gero.) attempted to revive any Roman characteristics. Although the size and overpowering feeling may give weight to a Roman feel, the Gero Crucifix was not consciously based on any Roman traditions. S. Ambroggio in Milan is reminiscent of Roman developments in a conscious revival of following. For example the construction of the building bears this in mind, for as we can see by looking at the nave vaults they are built mainly of brick and rubble. This method dates back to the construction of Roman groin vaults, for example those in Basilica of Constantine. This seems to be a conscious move back to Roman building mater...

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Roman ART. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 19:54, August 21, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/74298.html