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Lost at Sea

Book Review Lost At Sea Lost At Sea was written by Patrick Dillon and published by Simon and Shuster in 1998. Lost at Sea is an exacting tale of two fishing boats thought unsinkable that were lost at sea without warning. The Americus and Altair two of the most modern fishing vessels in the ocean, manned by local men from the town of Anacortes disappear and comprise one of the worst disasters in fishing history. The A boats were built in Anacortes, Washington, by local shipbuilders, for Jeff Hendricks an entrepreneurial fleet-owner. The book goes on to tell the story of the travels on the workers and captains of his vessels. After the Americus and the Altair disappears the book shifts gears and follows the investigation of the accident by Captain John De Carteret of the U.S. Coast Guard. After interviewing everybody involved with the A-boats and investigating thoroughly Captain Carteret enlisted the help of Bruce Adee, who specialized in Marine Architecture and was a professor at the University of Washington in Seattle. The investigation stagnates; they simply can’t find any reason for the boats to sink. Until Adee is sent a photograph showing that the boats boot stripe had been repainted higher on the boat. This shed new light on the investigation because this meant that the boats had been riding too low in the water and proved that the boats were grossly overloaded. The book then shifts gears again and starts on the path to legislative change. Bob and Peggy Barry lost their son Peter when he took a summer job on a boat called the Western Sea and it sank. After the loss of their son they discovered the lack of safety laws in the fishing industry and embarked on a crusade for safety on the high seas. Lost At Sea portrays the commercial fishing industry from three different views, the actual account, from the view of actual characters, a description of the investigation of the tragedy. Followed by the narrative of how l...

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Lost at Sea. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 13:27, December 22, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/77962.html