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The Chinese New Year

“Whizzzzzzzzzz…BANG!” Yes, it’s that time of year again. A time where streets are lit up with bright flamboyant lights, sounds of crackling fireworks can be heard a mile away, smells of freshly baked moon cakes play with our nostrils, and the laughter of jovial people fill the air. No, it’s not Christmas, New Year’s Eve, Thanksgiving, or Labor Day. It’s the Chinese New Year! This is a time where all worries and sorrows are left behind and the only rule is to be merry and celebrate. Each year represents a different animal of the Chinese Zodiac and this New Year is the year of the horse. Why is the Chinese New Year so awesome? Three reasons: 1) It tells of an amazing origin of the Chinese culture, 2) It is when Chinese cooking and cuisine goes all out, and 3) We celebrate it with our own style and flare. Chinese New Year one of the most amazing holidays known to man and that’s a fact. When we celebrate the Chinese New Year, we are celebrating China’s rich, fascinating, and prosperous history and culture. Back in the days of the ‘Dynasties’, the year revolved around the lunar cycle and when the new year came, the emperors would hold gargantuan feasts in honor of the gods who would in turn bring forth a new year filled with prosperity, fortune, and happiness. Each of the lesser peoples would have their own parties and invite their families and friends. Once gathered around the table, many dishes would be brought out and together they would dine. After the feast, the families would have moon cakes in honor of the gods and bring good luck into their future. Then at night, a festive and jovial parade would tread across town where reenactments of legendary stories would be shown. Also, dragons and lions would line the streets and dance about while fireworks filled the night sky with their multitudes of color and thunderous drums of sound scared away the evil spirits. It was and still is a sight to behold....

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The Chinese New Year. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 11:07, November 24, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/86879.html