Epiphany in Araby

Length: 2 Pages 538 Words

Araby, by James Joyce, is a tale that examines first love and the confusions that surround it. The epiphany of the story is the boy's discovery that the ideal gives way to the real. This journey is a quick one and the author wastes no time setting the scene and shaping the boy's persona. In the first paragraph Joyce paints a scene of a dismal reality with his description of the houses and the neighborhood. One thing of interest is that he uses the word "blind" twice in the first two sentences. This is perhaps a foreshadowing of the characters and a statement about the nature of all men. Right away it is obvious that the girl was the object of his adolescent desires. In fact, he was obsessed with her. He watched her every morning, followed her to school, fantasized about her, prayed, Continue...


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" Joyce appeals to the hearts of all through this universal "rite of passage. Finally the girl, who is "blind" to his love, speaks to him. His love, like his magical quest for a gift, ends with his realizing that it existed only in his mind. She asks him if he is going to Araby. Inside, the boy has this grand idea how everything will be. His uncle, "blind" to his needs and anguish, makes him get a late start. " After all, who has not experienced the "blindness" of first love . He came seeking fulfillment but is left empty, finding the bazaar dirty and disappointing. He recognizes "a silence like that which pervades a church after a service" (Dubliners; p. There is something mysterious and exotic about her. not to God, but to the concept of love and perhaps even to the girl (secretly), and even admits that "her name was like a summons to all my foolish blood" (Dubliners; p. Now this bazaar is somehow romantic and mysterious. He was alone on the train and for the first time might have started to realize how isolated he had become.

PROFESSIONAL ESSAYS:

Universality of Main Character in "Araby"
According to Joyce, a trivial incident can lead to an epiphany û a "sudden The discrepancies between his romantic vision of Araby and its reality shatters his (1247 5 )

Symbolism in "Araby"
The boy is late getting to Araby because his uncle was late coming home to disappointment and disillusion the boy feels leads to what Joyce terms an epiphany. (1082 4 )

Symbolism in "Araby"
The boy is late getting to Araby because his uncle was late coming home to disappointment and disillusion the boy feels leads to what Joyce terms an epiphany. (1081 4 )

Dubliners
According to Joyce, a trivial incident can lead to an epiphany û a The discrepancies between his romantic vision of Araby and its reality shatters his idealism (1247 5 )

Comparison of Protagonists in 2 Stories
However, Araby is nothing like the romantic, exotic realm he had imagined. Joyce writes of the epiphany the boy experiences: "I saw myself as a creature driven (1421 6 )