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Divorce

Divorce Judgment According to www.divorcereform.org (September 16, 2002), in the United States "about 50% of first marriages for men under age 45 may end in divorce, and between 44 and 52% of women's first marriages may end in divorce for these age groups.” With nearly 50% of all marriages ending in failure, this may also involve children and custody issues. Although the parents/divorcees, or in some cases the children, can choose with whom they reside, a judge has the final decision in this matter by deciding if that situation would be suitable for the children’s well being. This system of judgment is fair, and is suitable for these scenarios. As a child, my parents were divorced when I was five years old. Instead of my parents giving their five-year-old child the chance to decide with whom they wanted to live, they decided, with support from the judge, that it would be best for my sister and I to reside with my homemaker mother. Fortunately for my family, my father made an adequate income and was able to make both child support and alimony payments to my mother each month. These payments from his hard work supported us. Since my mother was not forced to get a job, she was able to stay home with her two young children, but if I had lived with my father he would have been at work each day. The judge knew this and agreed with my parents’ decision of where our residence should take place. However, if they had given me the decision I may have chosen my father and this would have not given me the best situation of the two. A judge is given the opportunity to look at all aspects of a situation without getting involved in the emotional aspects. He/she can examine the financial aspects of the situation and determine if this is would be the best scenario, of the two parents, to raise a child. A judge can examine this and take some pressure off of the child as well, since the child may feel the pressure to choose whom “they love more....

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Divorce. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 04:44, October 25, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/90608.html