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The Iliad

Heroic Code Throughout The Iliad, the heroic characters make decisions based on an precise set of principles, which are looked upon as the "heroic code” The heroic code that Homer presents in "The Iliad" is a basic cause for the events that take place, but many of the characters have various perceptions of how highly and to what value the code should be looked up. Many of the characters in the Iliad present the code of honor in different ways. In my opinion, a heroic person is not necessarily a godly person, however they do many great things for their people, are great fighters, friends and men. The Heroic Code can be defined as “unwritten rules that guide the conduct of the Homeric Heroes.” For the Heroic Code, success means survival and greater honor; failure means death and removal from the struggle for honor. What the Heroic code is saying is that honor is more important than life itself. It is obvious throughout the books that the characters of high honor are the ones that ignore warnings to stay away from danger, battles, etc. Courage, physical abilities, and social status are also important contributions to the Heroic code. Many readers have found the Homeric code brutal and cruel, but one cannot understand the true dedication to this code without becoming custom to the values back then. Victory, however is not the only importance, being remembered as a hero, and courageous is what we think Hektor is one of the main characters of the Iliad who fights for the Trojans. His dedication and strict belief in the code of honor is illustrated many times throughout the course of The Iliad. An example of this is presented in book three of the poem, where Hektor reprimands Paris for refusing to fight. He says to Paris, “Surely now the flowing-haired Achains laugh at us, thinking you are our bravest champion, only because your looks are handsome, but there is no strength in your heart, or courage”...

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The Iliad. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 22:51, November 23, 2014, from http://www.megaessays.com/viewpaper/99599.html